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Touching Street Encounters

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The key to good street photography is a very keen eye for those special moments that happen all the time around us. Henri Cartier-Bresson had it, Robert Doisneau had it and more recently Matt Stuart has it. The work of these photographers make us smile and giggle at touching moments in the ordinary streets of Europe. And now we can add China to this list. Self thought photographer Tao Liu Has took up the camera while working as a water meter reader.

His work as a water meter reader, as wonderful as it  is to say, the job really was dull and boring. He made use of his daily strolls trough the streets of Hefei in the Anhui Province. And in-between the reading of water meters he photographed the streets. In a fun and joyful manner. He really has a keen eye for those brief moments, that when we realize what we have witnessed it has already gone. Luckily there is Tao Lui Has. Check out his profile on Flickr to find more wonders of the streets of Hefei.

Tao Lui Has’ Flickr account: www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

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Tao Lui Has’ Flickr account: www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

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Drive by Shooting by Johnny Tergo

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Google Streets eat your hearth out. Photographer Johnny Tergo combined the mapping style of google with the drive by shooting we know out of those certain neighborhoods in Los Angeles. Which happens to be the photographers home town. Tergo drives around in a car tricked out with strobes. He shoots LA’s pedestrians. Some photographs look to be straight from a hollywood movie. His strobes help to achieve this effect. The side mirror of the car can be seen in each image. It reminds us of being in a car. Looking at people whom we come across as we drive along the streets of Los Angeles. The series is called Passenger Side Window. The complete series now consist out of 62 photographs. Visit his website to see the complete set.

I am Constantly seeing interesting people whom I have the urge to photograph while driving past them on the streets. I built a series of interesting images of people on the street without the individuals knowledge, just as I saw it before me. I accomplished this by building a custom rig in my truck that is made up of generators, strobes, a digital capture station with remote fire capability and of course a mounted camera. This method also allowed me to light the images without having to set-up a series of lights for each individual portrait. In essence I built myself a driving studio.

In this series I seek to explore the interplay of environment and the individuals that occupy the space.

Johnny Tergo’s website: johnnytergo.com

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Exploding Street Style Fashion Photography

The art of Fashion needs to be covered. And photography is perhaps the perfect way to capture and share those new styles and trends in fashion. And with social media and fashion blogs on the internet it’s easy to reach a large crowd fast. The editors and photographers of these blogs swarm around the fashionable people attracted by Fashion Weeks held around the world. Chasing them, photographing them and in a way consuming their fashion styles to be shared among their hundreds or thousands, perhaps millions followers.

The short documentary created by Garage Magazine is called Take My Picture that explores this explosion in Street Fashion Photography.

When we set out to make this short, our intention simply was to observe the phenomenon of fashion bloggers and street style stars. As we started to review the footage, two salient trends became apparent: fashion editors frustrated by the ensuing commotion outside of shows, and the rise of “peacocking” street style stars as a result of the proliferation of blogs. This film examines these themes from both perspectives. – GARAGE MAGAZINE

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A Slice Of Day

Henri Cartier-Bresson said; “To me, photography is the simultaneous recognition, in a fraction of a second, of the significance of an event.”  And this goes also for the black and white photographs by Dutch photographer Job Jonathan Schlingemann. He too tries to find the significance of an event. That moment of the day in which something special happens. What that is? Who knows. All he tries to capture is the emotion that clarifies that intersection of time, light and scene into one single photograph. To quote Job Jonathan Schlingemann:

In my work I am looking for subtle moments of beauty in everyday life. Ordinary occurrences that by play of light and manner of perception for ta brief time create something extra-ordinary. A photograph works for me if subject, light and surroundings merge in perfect harmony to form one whole and triggering one single emotion. 

The combination of the black and white, the long shadows and those wonderful compositions does make for an intriguing series. He manages to show us the ordinary in an extraordinary way. I truly feel what he is set out to do. Capturing the beauty in everyday life.

Job Jonathan Schlingemann’s website: www.splinter.tv

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The Contrast in Being

The following series reminded me of a line from the song Empire State of Mind by Jay-Z: “…concrete jungle where dreams are made of…”. But this concrete jungle seems to overtake and isolate it’s creator. Let alone its dreams. The human beings stuck in between the dream and the reality. This wonderful photo series shot by Dutch photographer Job Jonathan Schlingemann gives us a glimpse into this contradicting world.  A world between beautiful geometrical shapes of the sky scraping buildings and the tiny, seemingly insignificant but nonetheless driven, people who walk among them. The artist is fascinated by the contrasts he sees:

I am fascinated by this business districts with all its concrete and geometric shapes and in between those huge buildings, the human being. This human being seems driven by a purpose; his function in this world. He seems isolated. The contrast between those two sometimes seems almost poetic.

The photographs are beautifully lit. The photographer really knows how to find that perfect moment to share his fascination. The light and the colors are just marvelous.

Job Jonathan Schlingemann’s website: www.splinter.tv

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The World is Black and White

One way to approach photography could be using the Zone-System invented by Ansel Adams. When using this system one makes sure that the intended dynamic range is well-lit in your photograph. By using initially 10 steps from black to white the contrast of the image will look natural and all intended will be visible. A famous photograph of Adams was that of a small town shot by night, lit only by the moon.

Of course Ansel Adams’ work is wonderful and unique in its kind but it leaves not much to the imagination. But by blacking out areas in a photo, you can create a story and a tension that can only be filled in by the viewer. And that is exactly what Gabrielle Croppi did in his series Metaphysics of an Urban Landscape. In a way Gabrielle uses a 3 zone system. Using only black, gray and white he composes images with a high contrast. Images which are very open for interpretation. His high contrast photographs makes the usual suspects when it comes to recognizable landmarks into something that could have come straight out of a Hollywood film. Scenes loaded with drama. Scenes that reminds me of the works by the great American painter Edward Hopper.

Gabriel Croppi’s website: www.gabrielecroppi.com

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A Culture of Sitting and Waiting

Many of us are daily commuters. From home to work or from home to school. By trains, subway or car. If you take the same route everyday for a couple of years you probably start recognizing some faces. Jonathan Castillo photographed people in their cars during a commute. The series’ called Car Culture. It makes for a pretty interesting series. By using available light and a strobe the subject is lit beautifully. Those faces staring away in the distance, being bored while waiting for the traffic light to turn green. An interesting way of street photography to capture those lost hours of our lives behind another car.

Jonathan Castillo’s website: www.jonmichealphoto.com

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